Paperplane

Paperplane

03rd Feb 2010 - 09th Feb 2010

Opening Wed 3rd 7pm. Open daily 11-6pm

Caline Aoun, Niall De Buitléar, Guestroom, Vera Klute

Curated by Mary Conlon

paperplane responds to recent negotiations between European editors and an internet search engine regarding a lucrative and legislated agreement on the digitisation of the world’s books. Fears that the world’s ‘last library’ might be controlled as a commercial enterprise have sparked debate about the future of literature in light of the proliferation of virtual records as well as the simultaneous decline of readership. Digitisation allows for more practical and accessible circulation of texts and for new life to be breathed into forgotten publications. Consequently, however, the book in its physical form becomes a rarefied object of obsolete function.

Opens Wed 3rd Feb 7pm runs until 9th Feb 11-6

Caline Aoun, Niall De Buitléar, Guestroom, Vera Klute Curated by Mary Conlon paperplane responds to recent negotiations between European editors and an internet search engine regarding a lucrative and legislated agreement on the digitisation of the world's books. Fears that the world's 'last library' might be controlled as a commercial enterprise have sparked debate about the future of literature in light of the proliferation of virtual records as well as the simultaneous decline of readership. Digitisation allows for more practical and accessible circulation of texts and for new life to be breathed into forgotten publications. Consequently, however, the book in its physical form becomes a rarefied object of obsolete function. Opens Wed 3rd Feb 7pm runs until 9th Feb 11-6Caline Aoun, Niall De Buitléar, Guestroom, Vera Klute Curated by Mary Conlon paperplane responds to recent negotiations between European editors and an internet search engine regarding a lucrative and legislated agreement on the digitisation of the world's books. Fears that the world's 'last library' might be controlled as a commercial enterprise have sparked debate about the future of literature in light of the proliferation of virtual records as well as the simultaneous decline of readership. Digitisation allows for more practical and accessible circulation of texts and for new life to be breathed into forgotten publications. Consequently, however, the book in its physical form becomes a rarefied object of obsolete function. Opens Wed 3rd Feb 7pm runs until 9th Feb 11-6
Caline Aoun, Niall De Buitléar, Guestroom, Vera Klute Curated by Mary Conlon paperplane responds to recent negotiations between European editors and an internet search engine regarding a lucrative and legislated agreement on the digitisation of the world's books. Fears that the world's 'last library' might be controlled as a commercial enterprise have sparked debate about the future of literature in light of the proliferation of virtual records as well as the simultaneous decline of readership. Digitisation allows for more practical and accessible circulation of texts and for new life to be breathed into forgotten publications. Consequently, however, the book in its physical form becomes a rarefied object of obsolete function. Opens Wed 3rd Feb 7pm runs until 9th Feb 11-6Caline Aoun, Niall De Buitléar, Guestroom, Vera Klute Curated by Mary Conlon paperplane responds to recent negotiations between European editors and an internet search engine regarding a lucrative and legislated agreement on the digitisation of the world's books. Fears that the world's 'last library' might be controlled as a commercial enterprise have sparked debate about the future of literature in light of the proliferation of virtual records as well as the simultaneous decline of readership. Digitisation allows for more practical and accessible circulation of texts and for new life to be breathed into forgotten publications. Consequently, however, the book in its physical form becomes a rarefied object of obsolete function. Opens Wed 3rd Feb 7pm runs until 9th Feb 11-6Caline Aoun, Niall De Buitléar, Guestroom, Vera Klute Curated by Mary Conlon paperplane responds to recent negotiations between European editors and an internet search engine regarding a lucrative and legislated agreement on the digitisation of the world's books. Fears that the world's 'last library' might be controlled as a commercial enterprise have sparked debate about the future of literature in light of the proliferation of virtual records as well as the simultaneous decline of readership. Digitisation allows for more practical and accessible circulation of texts and for new life to be breathed into forgotten publications. Consequently, however, the book in its physical form becomes a rarefied object of obsolete function. Opens Wed 3rd Feb 7pm runs until 9th Feb 11-6