Vertical Drift: Chris Timms

Vertical Drift: Chris Timms

26th Aug 2011

5.30pm - 9.30pm

Vertical Drift

“A fall toward objects without reservation, embracing a world of forces and matter, which lacks any original stability and sparks the sudden shock of the open: a freedom that is terrifying, utterly deterritorializing, and always already unknown. Falling means ruin and demise as well as love and abandon, passion and surrender, decline and catastrophe. Falling is corruption as well as liberation, a condition that turns people into things and vice versa. It takes place in an opening we could endure or enjoy, embrace or suffer, or simply accept as reality [...] falling does not only mean falling apart, it can also mean a new certainty falling into place. Grappling with crumbling futures that propel us backwards onto an agonizing present, we may realize that the place we are falling toward is no longer grounded, nor is it stable. It promises no community, but a shifting formation. ”[1]

To engage with the vertical axis is to shift the reference points of orientation; from the stabilising illusion of horizontal perspective that imposes a reductive geometry upon the earths surface, to the vanishing points of the stars above, and to below, towards the molten core of the earth and beyond. If, as Hiro Steyerl suggests, we cannot assume any stable ground on which to base metaphysical claims or foundational political myths, freefalling can be considered more like the feeling of floating during weightlessness, where the denial of any stable bearings situates us in an ambiguous position that feels both like a form of limbo and a space of potential freedom.

In a format that acknowledges the that the majority of a show’s attendance occurs on an exhibition’s opening night, Vertical Drift is a one-off, four hour long show that explores verticality and the proposition of cultural groundlessness in which Timms engages with virtual objects, earthquake-proof architecture, a Remote Viewer, and synthetic geographical forms.

Chris Timms (b.1984) studied at the National College of Art and Design and the AKI University, Netherlands, and is currently based in Dublin. A founding member of the Good Hatchery in Offaly, he recently undertook M.O.O.N., a public project hosted by The Black Mariah, C.I.T Crawford, and the Cork Artists Collective during a residency in The Guesthouse, Cork, and has previously exhibited with the Market Studios (IRL), Estonian Artists Association (EES) and Kongsi (NL).

[1] Hito Steryel: “In Free Fall: A Thought Experiment on Vertical Perspective” , E-Flux Journal #24, 04/11

Vertical Drift “A fall toward objects without reservation, embracing a world of forces and matter, which lacks any original stability and sparks the sudden shock of the open: a freedom that is terrifying, utterly deterritorializing, and always already unknown. Falling means ruin and demise as well as love and abandon, passion and surrender, decline and catastrophe. Falling is corruption as well as liberation, a condition that turns people into things and vice versa. It takes place in an opening we could endure or enjoy, embrace or suffer, or simply accept as reality [...] falling does not only mean falling apart, it can also mean a new certainty falling into place. Grappling with crumbling futures that propel us backwards onto an agonizing present, we may realize that the place we are falling toward is no longer grounded, nor is it stable. It promises no community, but a shifting formation. ”[1] To engage with the vertical axis is to shift the reference points of orientation; from the stabilising illusion of horizontal perspective that imposes a reductive geometry upon the earths surface, to the vanishing points of the stars above, and to below, towards the molten core of the earth and beyond. If, as Hiro Steyerl suggests, we cannot assume any stable ground on which to base metaphysical claims or foundational political myths, freefalling can be considered more like the feeling of floating during weightlessness, where the denial of any stable bearings situates us in an ambiguous position that feels both like a form of limbo and a space of potential freedom. In a format that acknowledges the that the majority of a show's attendance occurs on an exhibition's opening night, Vertical Drift is a one-off, four hour long show that explores verticality and the proposition of cultural groundlessness in which Timms engages with virtual objects, earthquake-proof architecture, a Remote Viewer, and synthetic geographical forms. Chris Timms (b.1984) studied at the National College of Art and Design and the AKI University, Netherlands, and is currently based in Dublin. A founding member of the Good Hatchery in Offaly, he recently undertook M.O.O.N., a public project hosted by The Black Mariah, C.I.T Crawford, and the Cork Artists Collective during a residency in The Guesthouse, Cork, and has previously exhibited with the Market Studios (IRL), Estonian Artists Association (EES) and Kongsi (NL). [1] Hito Steryel: “In Free Fall: A Thought Experiment on Vertical Perspective” , E-Flux Journal #24, 04/11Vertical Drift “A fall toward objects without reservation, embracing a world of forces and matter, which lacks any original stability and sparks the sudden shock of the open: a freedom that is terrifying, utterly deterritorializing, and always already unknown. Falling means ruin and demise as well as love and abandon, passion and surrender, decline and catastrophe. Falling is corruption as well as liberation, a condition that turns people into things and vice versa. It takes place in an opening we could endure or enjoy, embrace or suffer, or simply accept as reality [...] falling does not only mean falling apart, it can also mean a new certainty falling into place. Grappling with crumbling futures that propel us backwards onto an agonizing present, we may realize that the place we are falling toward is no longer grounded, nor is it stable. It promises no community, but a shifting formation. ”[1] To engage with the vertical axis is to shift the reference points of orientation; from the stabilising illusion of horizontal perspective that imposes a reductive geometry upon the earths surface, to the vanishing points of the stars above, and to below, towards the molten core of the earth and beyond. If, as Hiro Steyerl suggests, we cannot assume any stable ground on which to base metaphysical claims or foundational political myths, freefalling can be considered more like the feeling of floating during weightlessness, where the denial of any stable bearings situates us in an ambiguous position that feels both like a form of limbo and a space of potential freedom. In a format that acknowledges the that the majority of a show's attendance occurs on an exhibition's opening night, Vertical Drift is a one-off, four hour long show that explores verticality and the proposition of cultural groundlessness in which Timms engages with virtual objects, earthquake-proof architecture, a Remote Viewer, and synthetic geographical forms. Chris Timms (b.1984) studied at the National College of Art and Design and the AKI University, Netherlands, and is currently based in Dublin. A founding member of the Good Hatchery in Offaly, he recently undertook M.O.O.N., a public project hosted by The Black Mariah, C.I.T Crawford, and the Cork Artists Collective during a residency in The Guesthouse, Cork, and has previously exhibited with the Market Studios (IRL), Estonian Artists Association (EES) and Kongsi (NL). [1] Hito Steryel: “In Free Fall: A Thought Experiment on Vertical Perspective” , E-Flux Journal #24, 04/11
Vertical Drift “A fall toward objects without reservation, embracing a world of forces and matter, which lacks any original stability and sparks the sudden shock of the open: a freedom that is terrifying, utterly deterritorializing, and always already unknown. Falling means ruin and demise as well as love and abandon, passion and surrender, decline and catastrophe. Falling is corruption as well as liberation, a condition that turns people into things and vice versa. It takes place in an opening we could endure or enjoy, embrace or suffer, or simply accept as reality [...] falling does not only mean falling apart, it can also mean a new certainty falling into place. Grappling with crumbling futures that propel us backwards onto an agonizing present, we may realize that the place we are falling toward is no longer grounded, nor is it stable. It promises no community, but a shifting formation. ”[1] To engage with the vertical axis is to shift the reference points of orientation; from the stabilising illusion of horizontal perspective that imposes a reductive geometry upon the earths surface, to the vanishing points of the stars above, and to below, towards the molten core of the earth and beyond. If, as Hiro Steyerl suggests, we cannot assume any stable ground on which to base metaphysical claims or foundational political myths, freefalling can be considered more like the feeling of floating during weightlessness, where the denial of any stable bearings situates us in an ambiguous position that feels both like a form of limbo and a space of potential freedom. In a format that acknowledges the that the majority of a show's attendance occurs on an exhibition's opening night, Vertical Drift is a one-off, four hour long show that explores verticality and the proposition of cultural groundlessness in which Timms engages with virtual objects, earthquake-proof architecture, a Remote Viewer, and synthetic geographical forms. Chris Timms (b.1984) studied at the National College of Art and Design and the AKI University, Netherlands, and is currently based in Dublin. A founding member of the Good Hatchery in Offaly, he recently undertook M.O.O.N., a public project hosted by The Black Mariah, C.I.T Crawford, and the Cork Artists Collective during a residency in The Guesthouse, Cork, and has previously exhibited with the Market Studios (IRL), Estonian Artists Association (EES) and Kongsi (NL). [1] Hito Steryel: “In Free Fall: A Thought Experiment on Vertical Perspective” , E-Flux Journal #24, 04/11Vertical Drift “A fall toward objects without reservation, embracing a world of forces and matter, which lacks any original stability and sparks the sudden shock of the open: a freedom that is terrifying, utterly deterritorializing, and always already unknown. Falling means ruin and demise as well as love and abandon, passion and surrender, decline and catastrophe. Falling is corruption as well as liberation, a condition that turns people into things and vice versa. It takes place in an opening we could endure or enjoy, embrace or suffer, or simply accept as reality [...] falling does not only mean falling apart, it can also mean a new certainty falling into place. Grappling with crumbling futures that propel us backwards onto an agonizing present, we may realize that the place we are falling toward is no longer grounded, nor is it stable. It promises no community, but a shifting formation. ”[1] To engage with the vertical axis is to shift the reference points of orientation; from the stabilising illusion of horizontal perspective that imposes a reductive geometry upon the earths surface, to the vanishing points of the stars above, and to below, towards the molten core of the earth and beyond. If, as Hiro Steyerl suggests, we cannot assume any stable ground on which to base metaphysical claims or foundational political myths, freefalling can be considered more like the feeling of floating during weightlessness, where the denial of any stable bearings situates us in an ambiguous position that feels both like a form of limbo and a space of potential freedom. In a format that acknowledges the that the majority of a show's attendance occurs on an exhibition's opening night, Vertical Drift is a one-off, four hour long show that explores verticality and the proposition of cultural groundlessness in which Timms engages with virtual objects, earthquake-proof architecture, a Remote Viewer, and synthetic geographical forms. Chris Timms (b.1984) studied at the National College of Art and Design and the AKI University, Netherlands, and is currently based in Dublin. A founding member of the Good Hatchery in Offaly, he recently undertook M.O.O.N., a public project hosted by The Black Mariah, C.I.T Crawford, and the Cork Artists Collective during a residency in The Guesthouse, Cork, and has previously exhibited with the Market Studios (IRL), Estonian Artists Association (EES) and Kongsi (NL). [1] Hito Steryel: “In Free Fall: A Thought Experiment on Vertical Perspective” , E-Flux Journal #24, 04/11Vertical Drift “A fall toward objects without reservation, embracing a world of forces and matter, which lacks any original stability and sparks the sudden shock of the open: a freedom that is terrifying, utterly deterritorializing, and always already unknown. Falling means ruin and demise as well as love and abandon, passion and surrender, decline and catastrophe. Falling is corruption as well as liberation, a condition that turns people into things and vice versa. It takes place in an opening we could endure or enjoy, embrace or suffer, or simply accept as reality [...] falling does not only mean falling apart, it can also mean a new certainty falling into place. Grappling with crumbling futures that propel us backwards onto an agonizing present, we may realize that the place we are falling toward is no longer grounded, nor is it stable. It promises no community, but a shifting formation. ”[1] To engage with the vertical axis is to shift the reference points of orientation; from the stabilising illusion of horizontal perspective that imposes a reductive geometry upon the earths surface, to the vanishing points of the stars above, and to below, towards the molten core of the earth and beyond. If, as Hiro Steyerl suggests, we cannot assume any stable ground on which to base metaphysical claims or foundational political myths, freefalling can be considered more like the feeling of floating during weightlessness, where the denial of any stable bearings situates us in an ambiguous position that feels both like a form of limbo and a space of potential freedom. In a format that acknowledges the that the majority of a show's attendance occurs on an exhibition's opening night, Vertical Drift is a one-off, four hour long show that explores verticality and the proposition of cultural groundlessness in which Timms engages with virtual objects, earthquake-proof architecture, a Remote Viewer, and synthetic geographical forms. Chris Timms (b.1984) studied at the National College of Art and Design and the AKI University, Netherlands, and is currently based in Dublin. A founding member of the Good Hatchery in Offaly, he recently undertook M.O.O.N., a public project hosted by The Black Mariah, C.I.T Crawford, and the Cork Artists Collective during a residency in The Guesthouse, Cork, and has previously exhibited with the Market Studios (IRL), Estonian Artists Association (EES) and Kongsi (NL). [1] Hito Steryel: “In Free Fall: A Thought Experiment on Vertical Perspective” , E-Flux Journal #24, 04/11